THE EVERGLADES

& CLIMATE CHANGE

Everglades restoration will make South Florida more resilient

to the harmful impacts of sea level rise and climate change.

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EVERGLADES RESTORATION
will mitigate the effects of climate change by:

1) SUPPORTING OUR ECONOMY

Florida's environment is its economy. Climate change could have a devastating impact on Florida's unique and valuable environment. Tourism, real estate and recreation are essential industries that depend on a healthy Everglades. Everglades restoration will create 45,000 jobs and yield a 4:1 return on investment by rehabilitating the Everglades, South Florida's greatest tool in mitigating climate change harm.

2) PROTECTING CARBON SEQUESTRATION 

At present, the Everglades is often deprived of freshwater in the dry season, and overdried areas of the Everglades become an emitter of carbon through fire or peat soil oxidation. By hydrating this massive peatland, Everglades restoration will help protect the carbon stored in peat soils and maximize carbon sequestration capacity across this 3 million acre ecosystem

3) SAFEGUARDING DRINKING WATER

A drier Everglades and rising seas, due to climate change,  threaten South Florida's drinking water wells. Everglades restoration will slow saltwater intrusion into South Florida's wells and protect the freshwater supply desperately needed by South Florida's growing population.

4) PROVIDING STORM SURGE RESILIENCE

Climate change is harming unique environments like mangroves around the coast of the Everglades. Mangroves provide invaluable environmental benefits including stabilizing the shoreline, reducing flooding from storm surges, and protecting habitats.

5) AIDING SPECIES AND HABITATS IN ADAPTING TO CLIMATE CHANGE 

Increasing temperatures and sea level rise are impacting a variety of habitats within the Everglades, which is home to over 2,000 species of flora and fauna. Everglades restoration is the only measure that will increase the southern freshwater flow needed to stabilize these critical habitats which support world-renowned biodiversity. South Florida is home to two national parks, Everglades National Park and Biscayne National Park,  which  are among the most vulnerable to climate change.

THE IMPACT OF AMERICA'S EVERGLADES 

 

THE EVERGLADES

& CARBON SEQUESTRATION

The Everglades is composed of a variety of habitats that play essential roles in absorbing and retaining carbon. These habitats require freshwater to remain healthy and functional. By increasing flows of freshwater, restoration will help conserve these unique habitats and prevent the release of carbon to the atmosphere.

The carbon and greenhouse emissions equivalencies, per the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency of the carbon already sequestered in three integral Everglades habitats.

 
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MANGROVES IN EVERGLADES NATIONAL PARK 

  • 19.9-24.1 MILLION HOMES' energy use for one year, or

  • 189.9-230.3 BILLION POUNDS of coal burned.

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THE CENTRAL EVERGLADES

( water conservation areas )

  • 670.7 BILLION POUNDS of coal burned, or

  • 131.5 MILLION PASSENGER VEHICLES driven for one year.

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SEAGRASS BEDS IN FLORIDA BAY

  • 9.3-10.7 BILLION GALLONS of oil consumed, or

  • 20.6-23.8 MILLION PASSENGER VEHICLES driven for one year.

CLIMATE CHANGE

PUBLICATIONS

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EVERGLADES

& CLIMATE CHANGE ARTICLES

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in conducting cutting-edge science-based advocacy for The Everglades & climate change, please GIVE A GIFT.